mikeysmovieblog:

I came across this pic & loved it. Dunno when this was taken or for what. It seems to be newer than when The Shining was made (1980). To me it looks like Nicholson 1986-1990-ish. Room 237 was the room in the Overlook Hotel where Danny was attacked by the dead woman in the bathtub. On a side note, the documentary about Stanley Kubrick’s hidden meanings and symbolisms in the film The Shining has just been released on DVD/Blu Ray. Aptly titled Room 237, it is somewhat interesting if not really stretching at times. I did not entirely believe much of the subliminal messages they tried to show, but it was fun to watch all the same.

mikeysmovieblog:

I came across this pic & loved it. Dunno when this was taken or for what. It seems to be newer than when The Shining was made (1980). To me it looks like Nicholson 1986-1990-ish. Room 237 was the room in the Overlook Hotel where Danny was attacked by the dead woman in the bathtub. On a side note, the documentary about Stanley Kubrick’s hidden meanings and symbolisms in the film The Shining has just been released on DVD/Blu Ray. Aptly titled Room 237, it is somewhat interesting if not really stretching at times. I did not entirely believe much of the subliminal messages they tried to show, but it was fun to watch all the same.


ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST
One of my all-time favorite movies, as well as one of my favorite movie scenes…still touching after almost 40 years.

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST

One of my all-time favorite movies, as well as one of my favorite movie scenes…still touching after almost 40 years.


gaymikey801movies:

20 years of Tarantino brilliance! I truly believe cinema would be completely different (in a bad way) were it not for his bold, creative, stylish filmmaking! A true genius Still—2 deserved Best Screenplay Oscar wins, yet no Best Director or Picture wins? A crime! The year Forrest Gump won over Pulp Fiction is one of Oscar’s biggest blunders! Gump was great, but Pulp Fiction literally changed the history of cinema for years to come!

gaymikey801movies:

20 years of Tarantino brilliance! I truly believe cinema would be completely different (in a bad way) were it not for his bold, creative, stylish filmmaking! A true genius Still—2 deserved Best Screenplay Oscar wins, yet no Best Director or Picture wins? A crime! The year Forrest Gump won over Pulp Fiction is one of Oscar’s biggest blunders! Gump was great, but Pulp Fiction literally changed the history of cinema for years to come!


gaymikey801movies:

If E.T The Extra Terrestrial had been a horror movie. Or, hey, they’ve done Alien crossovers (ie: Alien vs. Predator). Why not Elliot vs. Alien?? Found this funny anyhow…

gaymikey801movies:

If E.T The Extra Terrestrial had been a horror movie. Or, hey, they’ve done Alien crossovers (ie: Alien vs. Predator). Why not Elliot vs. Alien?? Found this funny anyhow…


gaymikey801movies:

AMAZING PSYCHO (1960) ART! 
My friend Nick shared this with me , and I had to post it HERE!!

gaymikey801movies:

AMAZING PSYCHO (1960) ART! 


My friend Nick shared this with me , and I had to post it HERE!!


gaymikey801movies:

One of the many great lines from Pitch Perfect!

gaymikey801movies:

One of the many great lines from Pitch Perfect!


gaymikey801movies:

MIKEY’S MOVIE REVIEW
THE IRON LADY ****1/2 out of 5 stars
Meryl Streep, the goddess of film, has done it yest again in her FLAWLESS portrayal of Margaret Thatcher. After 17 Oscar nominations (a record), this powerful performance won her 3rd award (the first since 1982’s “Sophie’s Choice”). The Iron Lady stars Streep as the mighty prime minister that led Britain for 11 years. In most ways, this dramatization of Margaret Thatcher’s life is a big pay-off. Instead of a film about the most consequential (like her or not) prime minister since Winston Churchill, we get the story of an old lady with dementia who remembers her life in scattered flashbacks. Instead of a movie that shows what made her extraordinary, we get one that shows how she, too, is subject to illness and the ravages of age. Like anybody else in life. The message I got from the movie was to take advantage of what is important in life NOW and realize we cannot change our past. Jim Broadbent, as Thatcher’s husband, is somewhat upstaged by Streep in a less showy, but essential and well-played role. The Oscar-winning makeup must also be mentioned because without it the film could never have worked. It’s some of the most realistic makeup work I have ever seen. The film has received mixed reviews, but this local critic liked it a lot. It may not be for all audiences, but it is a must-see for Streep’s performance if for no other reason (though I am still bitter she lost the Oscar for Doubt to the good, though not that special performance of Sandra Bullock in the sub-par film The Blind Side).

gaymikey801movies:

MIKEY’S MOVIE REVIEW


THE IRON LADY ****1/2 out of 5 stars

Meryl Streep, the goddess of film, has done it yest again in her FLAWLESS portrayal of Margaret Thatcher. After 17 Oscar nominations (a record), this powerful performance won her 3rd award (the first since 1982’s “Sophie’s Choice”). The Iron Lady stars Streep as the mighty prime minister that led Britain for 11 years. In most ways, this dramatization of Margaret Thatcher’s life is a big pay-off. Instead of a film about the most consequential (like her or not) prime minister since Winston Churchill, we get the story of an old lady with dementia who remembers her life in scattered flashbacks. Instead of a movie that shows what made her extraordinary, we get one that shows how she, too, is subject to illness and the ravages of age. Like anybody else in life. The message I got from the movie was to take advantage of what is important in life NOW and realize we cannot change our past. Jim Broadbent, as Thatcher’s husband, is somewhat upstaged by Streep in a less showy, but essential and well-played role. The Oscar-winning makeup must also be mentioned because without it the film could never have worked. It’s some of the most realistic makeup work I have ever seen. The film has received mixed reviews, but this local critic liked it a lot. It may not be for all audiences, but it is a must-see for Streep’s performance if for no other reason (though I am still bitter she lost the Oscar for Doubt to the good, though not that special performance of Sandra Bullock in the sub-par film The Blind Side).


gaymikey801movies:

MIKEY’S MOVIE REVIEW


AMOUR ***** out of 5 stars (review written November 4, 2012)

Anguishing French film with more honesty and grittiness than any film you will see this year. It’s the story of a long-wed couple named Anne & Georges, former music teachers, whose bonds of love are stretched & tested when Anne suffers a sudden and debilitating stroke. She makes her husband promise to never take her to the hospital again & he obliges.

The entire cast is amazing, in particular Emmanuelle Riva as Anne. She may very well be on her way to a rare “FOREIGN LANGUAGE” Best Actress Oscar-nomination in a few months. Through her expressions she tells a story of her own without uttering a word most times. The performance is so deep & well-conveyed, it’s like watching a documentary at times. It’s entirely accurate.

To see the internal struggle of Georges as he does his best to care for his wife is touching indeed. There are moments it feels like a horror movie as we witness his nightmares and watch him bathe, feed, lift, console, and change his wife’s dirty diapers. And you can see throughout the movie that Anne no longer wants to be alive, not in that state. She has gone from a distinguished socialite to an infant, who cannot even make sense anymore. She shows her humiliation & disgust throughout. It’s a terrible thing to witness, and its great acting and brutal scenery make it intensely intimate as if we are peeking into somebody’s terrible life, though we shouldn’t be. There is some very subtle symbolism, one involving a burglary, the other a trapped pigeon. Symbolism & true life drama you rarely see in American cinema. When I thought about the symbolism (really thought!) after viewing, it all made sense.

Is “Amour” entertaining? Not in the sense of having fun. But it’s story of dying presents a tale of living & true love that resonates with you for days, even weeks. It’s surely a film I will never forget. It’s truly stunning, for lack of a better word. Best Foreign Language Movie winner at the Oscars this year, I can guarantee without a doubt!


gaymikey801movies:

Movie Review — 
HESHER ***** out of 5 stars
Going into this movie I had no idea what to really expect. Turns out, in the spirit of American Beauty, Little Miss Sunshine, & Igby Goes Down, it’s one of the best movies of the year! Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the title role, plays his part REMARKABLY. He’s every American citizen’s worst nightmare, yet at the core of him, he’s likeable, even lovable. After he takes up residence, uninvited, in a grieving family’s home where things go haywire. Without spoiling the plot, lives are changed through the course of chaos & most surprising twists occur. The cast is wonderful. Rainn Wilson has never been better & it’s a JOY to see Piper Laurie (who, of course, infamously played “Carrie’s Mom” in 1976) back on-screen. It’s also great to see Natalie Portman play a role against typecast, brave indeed for a recent Oscar-winner. The end is undeniably touching and the movie as a whole is highly recommended!

gaymikey801movies:

Movie Review —


HESHER ***** out of 5 stars

Going into this movie I had no idea what to really expect. Turns out, in the spirit of American Beauty, Little Miss Sunshine, & Igby Goes Down, it’s one of the best movies of the year! Joseph Gordon-Levitt in the title role, plays his part REMARKABLY. He’s every American citizen’s worst nightmare, yet at the core of him, he’s likeable, even lovable. After he takes up residence, uninvited, in a grieving family’s home where things go haywire. Without spoiling the plot, lives are changed through the course of chaos & most surprising twists occur. The cast is wonderful. Rainn Wilson has never been better & it’s a JOY to see Piper Laurie (who, of course, infamously played “Carrie’s Mom” in 1976) back on-screen. It’s also great to see Natalie Portman play a role against typecast, brave indeed for a recent Oscar-winner. The end is undeniably touching and the movie as a whole is highly recommended!


gaymikey801movies:

MIKEY’S MOVIE REVIEW —
PITCH PERFECT ****1/2 out of 5 stars
Pitch Perfect??? Is it original? No, in  fact at times it reads exactly like a long “Glee” episode. Generally this is the type of movie I would avoid & never recommend to others. So what is different about this movie?
      It’s sharply written giving us some true laugh-out-loud moments. Not to say it’s a perfect script. There are one or two cringe-inducing moments and, in general, it’s a bit predictable. Still, kudos to it’s writer for succeeding in giving us something not too serious to laugh at for 110 minutes.
      The cast is quite astounding. Oscar-nominee Anna Kendrick plays the lead role with a commanding force and she has a long career ahead of her. The whole cast is wonderfully diverse (though a few are stereotypes), and the writer has given them all delightful back stories that are very amusing. Each character is very different on it’s own level & they all seem to have a back story, even if not revealed. That being said, the real scene-stealer here is Rebel Wilson (who played Kristen Wiig’s strange New Zealander roommate with the giant slug tattoo on her back in Bridesmaids). Wilson is a true comic gem & will certainly do  well in film if she keeps it up. Her character is the sharpest, wittiest, and most enjoyable in the film. For example, she introduces herself as Fat Amy. When the “popular” girls ask her why she calls herself Fat Amy, she responds: “Yeah, so twig bitches like you don’t do it behind my back.” How  true, how true. Sharp writing indeed.
      The music is surprisingly wonderful, and very creatively performed (Anna Kendrick’s “Cups” routine is amazing). The music showcases a bit of everything from disco, to 80’s, to current, and beyond. Very well-performed by the cast too.
      Of course romances ensue, things get in the way of everyone’s plans, and things typically turn out okay. That’s just the way movies like this one are. But I must say while Pitch Perfect is fluffy, it’s JUST as smart & entertaining. And I, for one, sometimes need a “fluffy” fun movie just to relax, have fun, and forget the world for a while. That’s what this one is, and I highly recommend it!

gaymikey801movies:

MIKEY’S MOVIE REVIEW —


PITCH PERFECT ****1/2 out of 5 stars

Pitch Perfect??? Is it original? No, in  fact at times it reads exactly like a long “Glee” episode. Generally this is the type of movie I would avoid & never recommend to others. So what is different about this movie?

      It’s sharply written giving us some true laugh-out-loud moments. Not to say it’s a perfect script. There are one or two cringe-inducing moments and, in general, it’s a bit predictable. Still, kudos to it’s writer for succeeding in giving us something not too serious to laugh at for 110 minutes.

      The cast is quite astounding. Oscar-nominee Anna Kendrick plays the lead role with a commanding force and she has a long career ahead of her. The whole cast is wonderfully diverse (though a few are stereotypes), and the writer has given them all delightful back stories that are very amusing. Each character is very different on it’s own level & they all seem to have a back story, even if not revealed. That being said, the real scene-stealer here is Rebel Wilson (who played Kristen Wiig’s strange New Zealander roommate with the giant slug tattoo on her back in Bridesmaids). Wilson is a true comic gem & will certainly do  well in film if she keeps it up. Her character is the sharpest, wittiest, and most enjoyable in the film. For example, she introduces herself as Fat Amy. When the “popular” girls ask her why she calls herself Fat Amy, she responds: “Yeah, so twig bitches like you don’t do it behind my back.” How  true, how true. Sharp writing indeed.

      The music is surprisingly wonderful, and very creatively performed (Anna Kendrick’s “Cups” routine is amazing). The music showcases a bit of everything from disco, to 80’s, to current, and beyond. Very well-performed by the cast too.

      Of course romances ensue, things get in the way of everyone’s plans, and things typically turn out okay. That’s just the way movies like this one are. But I must say while Pitch Perfect is fluffy, it’s JUST as smart & entertaining. And I, for one, sometimes need a “fluffy” fun movie just to relax, have fun, and forget the world for a while. That’s what this one is, and I highly recommend it!


gaymikey801movies:

MOVIE REVIEW
CABIN IN THE WOODS ***** (out of 5 stars)
Are we in the right theater? That was the first fleeting thought that went through my head during the opening few seconds of Drew Goddard’s Cabin in the Woods, as Steve and Richard (Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford) two middle-aged, middle-management types engage in banal conversation over a water cooler, in what appears to be a quasi-military scientific facility. Didn’t we show up to see attractive young people getting killed creatively in a rustic, natural setting? But soon enough, we’re presented with the good-looking collegians we expected: They’re all meeting up at the house of Dana (Kristen Connolly) for a weekend off the grid, packing into an RV to head to a remote mountain retreat. Even before they make their debut, though, it’s clear this is the right movie: There’s no mistaking the familiar tone of producer and co-writer Joss Whedon’s trademark witty banter in that opening scene. I was immediately reminded of The Truman Show. From there, things proceed, on one level, exactly as expected: some quick expository banter in the RV to establish the characters, a stop at a rundown gas station that seems drawn equally from Deliverance and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and eventual arrival at the cabin, shot to evoke the Evil Dead series. In the basement of the house, during a game of truth or dare (of course), the gang find a collection of creepy trinkets, baubles and assorted ephemera that looks like a horror-movie attic sale: sepia-toned photos of a long-dead family; a diary describing their violent past; blank-eyed porcelain dolls and puzzle boxes. Each one is a portent of bad things about to happen, which only the group’s resident stoner conspiracy theorist, Marty (Whedon regular Fran Kranz) seems to realize. The catch is that as this crew of slightly too-stereotypical archetypes goes through the horror movie motions, their every move is being monitored by Steve and Richard back at that facility, along with an army of supporting staffers and technicians, both observing and working to influence the proceedings. Nothing in this film is quite what it seems. A horror-movie attic sale is, in essence, exactly what Cabin in the Woods is, an attempt to exercise the genre of its formulaic possession by stuffing the movie full of its most overused and predictable elements and then dumping them through clever skewering. It would be unfair to speak in any kind of detail about the precise nature of the interaction between the cabin and the observers, or about some of the crazy images that Goddard manages to put onscreen during the chaos of the film’s completely insane climax. I will say that I was watching through tears of laughter flowing so freely that I probably didn’t even catch the entire parade of the bizarre in that sequence. But part of the pleasure of this movie, one of a great many pleasures, as it’s the most entertaining and satisfying horror movie I’ve seen in a long while, is to see how that relationship unfolds, and to be completely surprised by those images. Goddard and Whedon have created a wonderful puzzle of a film that is loving in its appreciation of good horror, even as it takes the genre (and its blood-lusty audience) to task for the unimaginative banality that has been too typical of recent scary movies. There’s a serious and smart critique here, and life-or-death stakes that only come from characters one genuinely cares about a neat trick, given that they’re set up to be so generic. But Whedon, the creator of a vampire slayer named Buffy, has always excelled at clever one-liners set against backdrops of unspeakable and ancient evil. Goddard, in his first turn as director, matches the verbal wit with memorable visual set-pieces that are as hilarious as they are horrific. It’s true that the symbolic connections drawn here aren’t exactly subtle, but subtlety in subtext has rarely been the prerogative of even the best horror. Neither is the movie particularly scary, but that’s not the aim here, either. Whedon and Goddard create a self-contained universe that plays by its own rules to serve its own critical agenda, and does so with smarts and skill. For all of its intellectual pleasures, though, Cabin in the Woods is a visceral roller coaster of a movie at heart. And like the best thrill rides, when it’s over, you just want to get back on and go again.

gaymikey801movies:

MOVIE REVIEW

CABIN IN THE WOODS ***** (out of 5 stars)

Are we in the right theater? That was the first fleeting thought that went through my head during the opening few seconds of Drew Goddard’s Cabin in the Woods, as Steve and Richard (Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford) two middle-aged, middle-management types engage in banal conversation over a water cooler, in what appears to be a quasi-military scientific facility. Didn’t we show up to see attractive young people getting killed creatively in a rustic, natural setting? But soon enough, we’re presented with the good-looking collegians we expected: They’re all meeting up at the house of Dana (Kristen Connolly) for a weekend off the grid, packing into an RV to head to a remote mountain retreat. Even before they make their debut, though, it’s clear this is the right movie: There’s no mistaking the familiar tone of producer and co-writer Joss Whedon’s trademark witty banter in that opening scene. I was immediately reminded of The Truman Show. From there, things proceed, on one level, exactly as expected: some quick expository banter in the RV to establish the characters, a stop at a rundown gas station that seems drawn equally from Deliverance and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and eventual arrival at the cabin, shot to evoke the Evil Dead series. In the basement of the house, during a game of truth or dare (of course), the gang find a collection of creepy trinkets, baubles and assorted ephemera that looks like a horror-movie attic sale: sepia-toned photos of a long-dead family; a diary describing their violent past; blank-eyed porcelain dolls and puzzle boxes. Each one is a portent of bad things about to happen, which only the group’s resident stoner conspiracy theorist, Marty (Whedon regular Fran Kranz) seems to realize. The catch is that as this crew of slightly too-stereotypical archetypes goes through the horror movie motions, their every move is being monitored by Steve and Richard back at that facility, along with an army of supporting staffers and technicians, both observing and working to influence the proceedings. Nothing in this film is quite what it seems. A horror-movie attic sale is, in essence, exactly what Cabin in the Woods is, an attempt to exercise the genre of its formulaic possession by stuffing the movie full of its most overused and predictable elements and then dumping them through clever skewering. It would be unfair to speak in any kind of detail about the precise nature of the interaction between the cabin and the observers, or about some of the crazy images that Goddard manages to put onscreen during the chaos of the film’s completely insane climax. I will say that I was watching through tears of laughter flowing so freely that I probably didn’t even catch the entire parade of the bizarre in that sequence. But part of the pleasure of this movie, one of a great many pleasures, as it’s the most entertaining and satisfying horror movie I’ve seen in a long while, is to see how that relationship unfolds, and to be completely surprised by those images. Goddard and Whedon have created a wonderful puzzle of a film that is loving in its appreciation of good horror, even as it takes the genre (and its blood-lusty audience) to task for the unimaginative banality that has been too typical of recent scary movies. There’s a serious and smart critique here, and life-or-death stakes that only come from characters one genuinely cares about a neat trick, given that they’re set up to be so generic. But Whedon, the creator of a vampire slayer named Buffy, has always excelled at clever one-liners set against backdrops of unspeakable and ancient evil. Goddard, in his first turn as director, matches the verbal wit with memorable visual set-pieces that are as hilarious as they are horrific. It’s true that the symbolic connections drawn here aren’t exactly subtle, but subtlety in subtext has rarely been the prerogative of even the best horror. Neither is the movie particularly scary, but that’s not the aim here, either. Whedon and Goddard create a self-contained universe that plays by its own rules to serve its own critical agenda, and does so with smarts and skill. For all of its intellectual pleasures, though, Cabin in the Woods is a visceral roller coaster of a movie at heart. And like the best thrill rides, when it’s over, you just want to get back on and go again.


gaymikey801movies:

MY REVIEW FOR “The Conjuring”:
THE CONJURING review: (***** out of 5 stars)
The giggles you hear during The Conjuring are the sounds of people who are delighted to be scared. Unlike the should-I-really-be-enjoying-this queasiness of, say, the first Saw movie or the yet-another-found-footage shocks of Paranormal Activity and its tiring ilk, The Conjuring is pure fun because it relies on our imaginations and on our sympathy for its characters more than it does sawed-off limbs or loud, sudden noises and visual effects. 
It’s a ghost story about a family that moves into a nightmarish house and the husband-and-wife demonology/clairvoyance team that tries to help them get over a severe case of buyer’s remorse brought upon by apparitions, murdered pets and a whole lot of things that go bump in the night (And when I say “bump in the night”, I mean BUMP IN THE NIGHT). Any number of those things are apt to startle you, and because you’re surprised by how easily the movie works its way into your head, make you giggle with relief. That’s one thing that really works for it. It is well-written and make us actually CARE about the characters, and flashes back to why they are in their positions, giving them motives ans believable insight essential to any movie, horror or not. It forces us to become involved in the characters psychologically, and that is when a film can truly have power over us. The fact that it’s a true story makes it all the more chilling. 
The cast is particularly great. Carolyn and Roger Perron (Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston) and their five girls are a kind, hard-working family that does not deserve to have phantasms puking down their throats. Spiritualists Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and the unbelievably fantastic Vera Farmiga) are calm, logical experts in the supernatural. We believe in what they’re doing, and the Perrons believe in it, because they don’t oversell it with dopey mumbo jumbo. The Warrens are people of faith and of science; they are dedicated to helping good people overcome God’s enemies. Ed and Lorraine’s most famous case was that of the The Amityville Horror (which is referenced in the latter part of the film). Lorraine Warren still does investigations today, and can be seen in such TV shows as Ghost Adventures. She also provides a cameo appearance in the film if you look closely. 
The other thing about those good actors? Their believable fear becomes ours. It starts with the children, a quintet of child actresses who are, as kids would be, intrigued by the mysteries of their new house but who quickly understand that the monsters under their beds are legitimately monsters under their beds. Parents’ inability to protect their children from everything adds to our identification with the families, especially since Farmiga emphasizes the maternal nature of Lorraine’s ghost-busting (she hates the spirits, but she has compassion for their pain) and because Taylor is such a natural, warm mom. They are scared, and frankly, who isn’t scared by the things out there that would do harm to children? Especially when they lurk in the shadows. 
Director James Wan keeps tight control on the frightening stuff, which mostly amounts to people or things in places where no person or thing is supposed to be. It’s a movie of creaking floorboards and dark corners and, as such, is best enjoyed in a dark theater full of screaming — and giggling — strangers. Perhaps the thing I admired most about The Conjuring is its ability to get into our heads and shock us without lavish visual effects or blood and guts. The psychological grip it had on me made me reminisce to such films as Silence of the Lambs and The Exorcist. That is not to say it is on the same level of those films, but through time will earn it’s place as one of the greatest in the horror genre. 
I also unexpectedly took away a message of hope and albeit peace in the end. The struggle between good and evil and the innocent being preyed upon has always existed throughout history and will never cease. Walking away, while disturbed, I felt lucky to have the knowledge of which side I choose to be on. Truly a must-see! I found it to be practically flawless. Not for the faint of heart by any means, but such a well-acted, well-written, and well-directed work of art. Chills and heebie jeebies abound…BRING IT ON!
Any thoughts or disagreements?

gaymikey801movies:

MY REVIEW FOR “The Conjuring”:


THE CONJURING review: (***** out of 5 stars)

The giggles you hear during The Conjuring are the sounds of people who are delighted to be scared. Unlike the should-I-really-be-enjoying-this queasiness of, say, the first Saw movie or the yet-another-found-footage shocks of Paranormal Activity and its tiring ilk, The Conjuring is pure fun because it relies on our imaginations and on our sympathy for its characters more than it does sawed-off limbs or loud, sudden noises and visual effects.

It’s a ghost story about a family that moves into a nightmarish house and the husband-and-wife demonology/clairvoyance team that tries to help them get over a severe case of buyer’s remorse brought upon by apparitions, murdered pets and a whole lot of things that go bump in the night (And when I say “bump in the night”, I mean BUMP IN THE NIGHT). Any number of those things are apt to startle you, and because you’re surprised by how easily the movie works its way into your head, make you giggle with relief. That’s one thing that really works for it. It is well-written and make us actually CARE about the characters, and flashes back to why they are in their positions, giving them motives ans believable insight essential to any movie, horror or not. It forces us to become involved in the characters psychologically, and that is when a film can truly have power over us. The fact that it’s a true story makes it all the more chilling.

The cast is particularly great. Carolyn and Roger Perron (Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston) and their five girls are a kind, hard-working family that does not deserve to have phantasms puking down their throats. Spiritualists Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and the unbelievably fantastic Vera Farmiga) are calm, logical experts in the supernatural. We believe in what they’re doing, and the Perrons believe in it, because they don’t oversell it with dopey mumbo jumbo. The Warrens are people of faith and of science; they are dedicated to helping good people overcome God’s enemies. Ed and Lorraine’s most famous case was that of the The Amityville Horror (which is referenced in the latter part of the film). Lorraine Warren still does investigations today, and can be seen in such TV shows as Ghost Adventures. She also provides a cameo appearance in the film if you look closely.

The other thing about those good actors? Their believable fear becomes ours. It starts with the children, a quintet of child actresses who are, as kids would be, intrigued by the mysteries of their new house but who quickly understand that the monsters under their beds are legitimately monsters under their beds. Parents’ inability to protect their children from everything adds to our identification with the families, especially since Farmiga emphasizes the maternal nature of Lorraine’s ghost-busting (she hates the spirits, but she has compassion for their pain) and because Taylor is such a natural, warm mom. They are scared, and frankly, who isn’t scared by the things out there that would do harm to children? Especially when they lurk in the shadows.

Director James Wan keeps tight control on the frightening stuff, which mostly amounts to people or things in places where no person or thing is supposed to be. It’s a movie of creaking floorboards and dark corners and, as such, is best enjoyed in a dark theater full of screaming — and giggling — strangers. Perhaps the thing I admired most about The Conjuring is its ability to get into our heads and shock us without lavish visual effects or blood and guts. The psychological grip it had on me made me reminisce to such films as Silence of the Lambs and The Exorcist. That is not to say it is on the same level of those films, but through time will earn it’s place as one of the greatest in the horror genre.

I also unexpectedly took away a message of hope and albeit peace in the end. The struggle between good and evil and the innocent being preyed upon has always existed throughout history and will never cease. Walking away, while disturbed, I felt lucky to have the knowledge of which side I choose to be on. Truly a must-see! I found it to be practically flawless. Not for the faint of heart by any means, but such a well-acted, well-written, and well-directed work of art. Chills and heebie jeebies abound…BRING IT ON!

Any thoughts or disagreements?


(via spookea)


gaymikey801movies:

HAHAHA! Just watched “Cujo" on Blu Ray a week ago!

gaymikey801movies:

HAHAHA! Just watched “Cujo" on Blu Ray a week ago!